The Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998 (LOLER) introduced new requirements for the safe provision and use of lifting equipment. Regulation 9 of LOLER requires that all lifting equipment provided for use in work activities are thoroughly examined by a competent person at regular intervals. This applies to lifts and hoists used to lift people or loads.


What is a thorough examination: ?
A thorough examination is a systematic and detailed examination of the Lifting Equipment by a competent person. Its aim is to detect any defects which are, or might become, dangerous, and for the competent person to report them to the duty holder and if appropriate, the enforcing authority (the Health and Safety Executive or Local Authority), so that appropriate remedial action can be taken.

To determine the extent of the thorough examination, the competent person will assess the risks, considering factors such as where the lifting equipment will be used, frequency of use, age and condition, the weight of loads to be lifted etc.

A thorough examination may include some testing, if the competent person considers it to be necessary. The competent person will normally determine what tests are required, taking account
Of the relevant guidance and standards, and duty holders are recommended to insist on this approach.

Thorough examination should NOT be confused with preventative maintenance although they have some elements in common. Preventative Maintenance usually involves replacing worn or damaged parts, topping up fluid levels and making routine adjustments to ensure risks are avoided. Thorough examination may act as a check that maintenance is being carried out properly, but is not intended to replace it.Role

The Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998 (LOLER) introduced new requirements for the safe provision and use of lifting equipment. Regulation 9 of LOLER requires that all lifting equipment provided for use in work activities are thoroughly examined by a competent person at regular intervals. This applies to lifts and hoists used to lift people or loads.
What is a thorough examination: ?
A thorough examination is a systematic and detailed examination of the Lifting Equipment by a competent person. Its aim is to detect any defects which are, or might become, dangerous, and for the competent person to report them to the duty holder and if appropriate, the enforcing authority (the Health and Safety Executive or Local Authority), so that appropriate remedial action can be taken.
To determine the extent of the thorough examination, the competent person will assess the risks, considering factors such as where the lifting equipment will be used, frequency of use, age and condition, the weight of loads to be lifted etc.
A thorough examination may include some testing, if the competent person considers it to be necessary. The competent person will normally determine what tests are required, taking account
Of the relevant guidance and standards, and duty holders are recommended to insist on this approach.
Thorough examination should NOT be confused with preventative maintenance although they have some elements in common. Preventative Maintenance usually involves replacing worn or damaged parts, topping up fluid levels and making routine adjustments to ensure risks are avoided. Thorough examination may act as a check that maintenance is being carried out properly, but is not intended to replace it. 

If you are notified of a serious and significant defect you should immediately take the Lifting Equipment out of service until the fault has been addressed. If you do not take the lifting equipment out of operation you will then be in breach of the law.
The competent person may also notify you of defects which need to be made good within a certain timescale. In this case, you should take steps to have the defective equipment repaired or replaced within the specified time, and not use the lifting equipment unless the defect has been satisfactorily remedied.
Documentation:
The competent person is legally required to send you a written and signed report of the thorough examination as soon as practicable. This should normally be within 28 days, but if there is a serious defect which needs to be addressed you should expect to receive the report much sooner.
If the competent person identifies a defect which presents and ‘existing or imminent risk of serious personal injury’ they are also legally required to send a copy of the report to the enforcing authority. By law, the report must contain certain information, specified in Schedule 1 of LOLER, it should;
Identify the equipment examined (serial number, make etc,), the employer and the premises ;
Give the d ate of the last thorough examination and specify when the next one should take place;
Specify the safe working load of the lifting equipment ;
Give reason for the thorough examination (ie following installation, according to an examination scheme, statutory intervals etc) ;
Identify any defect which is or may become a danger to people ;
Give the details of any repair, renewal or alteration required to remedy the defect and the date by which it should be undertaken.
Give details of any tests carried out;
Give details of the person carrying out the report and the person validating the report on their behalf .
If the report does NOT contain all the information above, you should not accept it, as this may place you in breach of the law. Try to resolve the matter with the competent person, but if this is unsuccessful you should contact your local enforcing authority for advice.
Record Keeping
You are legally required to ensure that reports of a Thorough Examination are kept available for consideration by Health and Safety Inspectors for at least two (2) years or until the next report, whichever is longer. They may be kept electronically as long as you can provide a written report if necessary.

THE LAW REQUIRES THAT ALL LIFTING EQUIPMENT WHEN IN USE SHOULD BE
THOROUGHLY EXAMINED.